Abused children more likely to abuse animals by Ed Boks

A great deal is known regarding the link between animal abuse and violence against humans.  In fact, law enforcement now tracks animal abuse alongside felonies like arson, burglary, assault, and homicide because it is thought that animal abuse may be a precursor to greater crimes including murder and serial killing.

A new study published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood may help pull back the curtain even further into helping us understand where the inclination for cruelty originates in the first place. Continue reading “Abused children more likely to abuse animals by Ed Boks”

July 14: First World Chimpanzee Day by Jane Goodall

Jane Goodall

14th July 2018.  The very first World Chimpanzee Day.

58 years to the day since I arrived for the very first time in what I then referred to, in my letters home, as “Chimpanzee Land”.  At the time it was the Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve in what was then Tanganyika – a British Protectorate.  Today, of course, it is the Gombe National Park in the independent country of Tanzania.

Jane at 26

I was 26 years old back then, and 58 years is a long time.  But if I close my eyes and let my mind free to wander into the past, I can relive that boat ride along the shore of Lake Tanganyika.  Continue reading “July 14: First World Chimpanzee Day by Jane Goodall”

Time to end the Rodeo loophole… by Ed Boks

Rodeo is animal abuse

Imagine a person chasing a scared puppy across an open field.  The frightened puppy is brutally clothes-lined by a rope thrown around her neck; her legs  fly out from under her.  Her attacker grabs her, lifts her waist high and body slams her to the ground.  Terrified, the puppy’s legs are tied together so she can’t escape her tormenter; and she is dragged by the neck with the rope.    Continue reading “Time to end the Rodeo loophole… by Ed Boks”

Something wicked this way comes: the rodeo by Ed Boks

Is the Rodeo coming to your town?

Rodeo animals are generally tame creatures who must be provoked into battle

They live lives filled with stress and fear.

Contestants practice their games on numerous calves, bulls, and horses, injuring and killing many animals before even entering the ring.

A contestant’s score is based on how long he can ride a struggling animal or how quickly he can overpower an animal.

Sprains, broken bones, muscle pulls, saddle blisters, spur wounds, flank strap wounds, punctured lungs, broken ribs, hematomas, bruising, and broken necks are common.

Wounded animals are quickly removed while the rodeo announcer and rodeo clowns distract the public.

The animals who become too injured to participate are sent to slaughter.

Rodeos are state sanctioned cruelty that must be outlawed!

The last rodeo by Ed Boks

Today is opening day for Prescott Frontier Days considered the World’s Oldest Rodeo.  Established in 1888, the event has occurred over every 4th of July weekend for 130 years – and features breath-taking performances that can result in animals suffering broken ribs, backs, and legs, torn tails, punctured lungs, internal organ damage, ripped tendons, torn ligaments, snapped necks, and agonizing deaths.

How can such mayhem exist in a state where animal cruelty is a felony?   In Arizona, rodeos are exempt from anti-cruelty laws.  In fact, the State of Arizona sanctions animal cruelty in activities involving hunting, ranching, farming, rodeos, shows and security services (ARS § 13-2910.05. Exempt activities). Continue reading “The last rodeo by Ed Boks”

Rodeo: state sanctioned animal cruelty by Ed Boks

For six years I served as executive director of the Yavapai Humane Society (YHS) – located in Prescott, Arizona – home to the world’s oldest rodeo.

During those six years western and central Yavapai County became the safest region in the United States for dogs and cats, having ended the use of killing/euthanasia to control pet overpopulation.  So successful was YHS in protecting dogs and cats that during my last two years at YHS, the society expanded its mission to include promoting and protecting the health, welfare and safety of horses. Continue reading “Rodeo: state sanctioned animal cruelty by Ed Boks”

Study shows physiological and behavioral benefits may be experienced by veterans with PTSD who have service dogs

Veteran with PTSD Therapy Dog

The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine released a study last week that shows how veterans with PTSD may benefit physiologically from using service dogs.

The study is the first published research to use a physiological marker to define the bio-behavioral effects of service dogs on veterans with PTSD.

The findings were published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, and they may be significant as scientific evidence of potential mental health benefits experienced by veterans with PTSD who have service dogs. Continue reading “Study shows physiological and behavioral benefits may be experienced by veterans with PTSD who have service dogs”

When it comes to pit bulls, how stupid are we? by Ed Boks

Collage by Beth Clifton

Every year, ANIMALS 24-7 conducts a national dog-breed survey.  The results of the 2018 survey were just released.  As interesting as the data collected by the survey are, I was particularly struck by a rather provocative proposition posed by Merritt Clifton, the editor/reporter of ANIMALS 24-7 and this survey.

Before exploring the thought provoking proposal, let’s set the stage:

The survey found that as of mid-June 2018, nearly 15% of all the dogs available for sale or adoption in the U.S. were pit bulls.  With that kind of market presence, one might conclude pit bulls are pretty popular in the U.S.  However, Mr. Clifton has another explanation. Continue reading “When it comes to pit bulls, how stupid are we? by Ed Boks”