Polls Show Younger Travelers Shun Attractions That Exploit Animals by Ed Boks

Young travelers shun attractions that exploit animals

September 27th is World Tourism Day.  That makes this a good day to consider the impact this trillion-dollar industry has on wildlife.

A recent poll suggests young travelers are becoming increasingly aware of the impact tourism has on animals.  This awareness is influencing their travel choices for the better. Continue reading “Polls Show Younger Travelers Shun Attractions That Exploit Animals by Ed Boks”

Consider the snail by Ed Boks

Consider the snail

In my last blog I discussed what we can learn from the ant regarding the benefits of collaboration and cooperation in the development of society.

Today I want to examine what we can learn from the snail regarding the detriments of social isolation.

In a recent article in the Independent, Sarah Dalesman explains that while stress negatively impacts the cognitive ability of numerous species, including their ability to learn and remember, the problems arising from stress are personal, and blanket statements regarding species may be misguided.  Like humans, Dalesman explains that “not all individuals of a particular species are equally good at cognitive tasks to begin with, and they respond to the effects of stress in different ways.” Continue reading “Consider the snail by Ed Boks”

Consider the ant by Ed Boks

Ancient wisdom tells us to “Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise: which having no guide, overseer, or ruler, provides her meat in the summer, and gathers her food in the harvest.” (Proverbs 6:6-8)

Conventional wisdom tells us that two heads are better than one.  Yet, on an individual level two heads will often butt — and we are told that when resources are scarce, competition is better than collaboration.

In a recent study published by Nature, a biologist looked to the ant to help understand how cooperation may have played an important role in the development of civil societies. Continue reading “Consider the ant by Ed Boks”

Time for a national conversation about pit bulls by Ed Boks

Merritt and Beth Clifton

Is it time national animal welfare organizations rethink their position on pit bulls?

This is the recommendation of Beth Clifton, a former Miami Beach police officer, animal control officer, elementary school teacher, veterinary technician and wife of Animals 24-7 editor Merritt Clifton.

Animals 24-7 recently published Beth Clifton’s open letter to Matthew Bershadker, president of the ASPCA; Julie Castle, president of Best Friends Animal Society; and Kitty Block, president of HSUS.  Continue reading “Time for a national conversation about pit bulls by Ed Boks”

The Best and Worst Cities for Pets by Ed Boks

Heading to Scottsdale, AZ – America’s Most Pet Friendly City

Nearly 85 million households in the U.S. that own pets want to live where their beloved companions can enjoy long, healthy lives without breaking the bank.  The American Pet Products Association projects that in 2018, pet ownership will cost Americans over $72 billion.

Years ago, pet owners had access to only a handful of businesses offering animal services and supplies.  Petco and PetSmart were among the biggest names.  But the market for pet businesses is growing to fill increasing consumer demand. For example, in 2017, the pet food industry grew three times as fast as the packaged food industry. And there are new ways to buy goods for your animal, such as monthly subscription boxes. Continue reading “The Best and Worst Cities for Pets by Ed Boks”

Advocates for Snake Preservation by Ed Boks

Imagine a world where snakes are respected and appreciated instead of feared and hated.

I recently became aware of an organization that I am so excited about that I want to immediately share my find with you.  Advocates for Snake PreservationASP, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to changing the way people view and treat snakes

Continue reading “Advocates for Snake Preservation by Ed Boks”

Is D.C. Cat Count really necessary? by Ed Boks

D.C. Cat Count includes hidden cameras to take photos of free roaming cats.

The New York Times reported today that the Humane Society of the United States, PetSmart Charities and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute is launching a $1.5 million, three-year plan to count all the stray, feral and pet cats living in Washington D.C.

The plan is called D.C. Cat Count; and it is a highly technological endeavor. As many as 60 camera traps will record images of outdoor cats. A smartphone app, (still in development), will allow anyone in D.C. to share pictures of feral and/or pet cats in an effort to build a comprehensive library of all the cats living in the District. Continue reading “Is D.C. Cat Count really necessary? by Ed Boks”

Abused children more likely to abuse animals by Ed Boks

A great deal is known regarding the link between animal abuse and violence against humans.  In fact, law enforcement now tracks animal abuse alongside felonies like arson, burglary, assault, and homicide because it is thought that animal abuse may be a precursor to greater crimes including murder and serial killing.

A new study published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood may help pull back the curtain even further into helping us understand where the inclination for cruelty originates in the first place. Continue reading “Abused children more likely to abuse animals by Ed Boks”

July 14: First World Chimpanzee Day by Jane Goodall

Jane Goodall

14th July 2018.  The very first World Chimpanzee Day.

58 years to the day since I arrived for the very first time in what I then referred to, in my letters home, as “Chimpanzee Land”.  At the time it was the Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve in what was then Tanganyika – a British Protectorate.  Today, of course, it is the Gombe National Park in the independent country of Tanzania.

Jane at 26

I was 26 years old back then, and 58 years is a long time.  But if I close my eyes and let my mind free to wander into the past, I can relive that boat ride along the shore of Lake Tanganyika.  Continue reading “July 14: First World Chimpanzee Day by Jane Goodall”

Time to end the Rodeo loophole… by Ed Boks

Rodeo is animal abuse

Imagine a person chasing a scared puppy across an open field.  The frightened puppy is brutally clothes-lined by a rope thrown around her neck; her legs  fly out from under her.  Her attacker grabs her, lifts her waist high and body slams her to the ground.  Terrified, the puppy’s legs are tied together so she can’t escape her tormenter; and she is dragged by the neck with the rope.    Continue reading “Time to end the Rodeo loophole… by Ed Boks”